RECTAL INSUFFLATIONS (RI)

PLEASE READ FIRSTHow to protect yourself from breathing ozone
What are rectal insufflations?
Rectal insufflations with a bag
direct rectal insufflations
– Rectal insufflations with a bag
    What equipment you need
    How to put the equipment together and how to use it
– Direct rectal insufflations
   What equipment you need
   How to put the equipment together and how to use it
   Risks and how to avoid them
Contraindications

 

WHAT ARE RECTAL INSUFFLATIONS?

During rectal insufflations a mix of ozone/oxygen is introduced through a catheter into the colon. It’s a type of an oxygen gas enema. The ozone helps remove inflammation, and kills pathogens like bacteria, viruses, parasites and yeast. It can help restore healthy gut flora. Some of the ozone is absorbed by the colon walls and the resulting oxidative by-products like ROS (reactive oxygen species) and LOP (lipid oxidation products) can travel through the portal vein to the liver. Some sources claim that RI are a valid substitute for ozone blood treatments, others (like Prof. Velio Bocci) call this into question. Recommended is to not introduce more than 500 ml of ozone at one time to prevent the possibility of rupturing the colon.

Rectal insufflations can be performed either

a) with the use of a bag (recommended)

A bag is connected to the ozone generator and filled with the desired amount of gas. It is then disconnected from the ozone generator, connected to a catheter which has been inserted into the rectum and the bag’s content then slowly introduced into the colon.

b) directly from the machine

The ozone generator is connected via silicone tubing directly to a catheter which is inserted in the person’s rectum. So the gas flows directly from the oxygen source through the ozone generator through the catheter into the colon.

 

RECTAL INSUFFLATIONS WITH A BAG, WHAT EQUIPMENT YOU NEED:

 

a) For rectal insufflations with a bag, you need:

oxygen source + ozone generator + bag + catheter

ozone rectal insufflations with bag diagram


Oxygen source: Either an oxygen tank or an oxygen concentrator can be used. The oxygen concentrator or tank does not have to be low flow since the gas is not introduced directly from the machine but with the use of an intermediary, the bag. So the risk of rupturing the colon is minimal. Whatever oxygen concentrator one chooses it should be able to produce between 20 and 40 ug/ml at the given oxygen flow. Please, consult the chart of your ozone generator to find out whether your machine can produce those ozone concentrations at the oxygen flows of your oxygen concentrator or tank.

Ozone generator It should be a generator which uses ozone resistant materials in the air chamber, can be fed oxygen from an oxygen concentrator or an oxygen tank, can reliably produce stable ozone concentrations at given oxygen flows, and does not exceed ozone concentrations of 80 ug/ml. For rectal insufflations it should be able to generate ozone concentrations between 20 and 40 ug/ml (gamma) at whatever oxygen flow you will set your oxygen source at.

Accessories: 1) A bag. It should be made of ozone resistant material. Ideal is silicone or teflon, PVC is fine, too. Or you can use a syringe instead. 2) Catheters: There are catheters made of 100% silicone. Others, more affordable, are made of PVC. 3) Connectors: either luer lock, or slip-on, or one-way valve if you use a syringe, see below. 4) You may also need additional silicone tubing.

This is the most commonly used bag for rectal insufflations. It has 3 chambers and holds up to 750 ml of gas. It connects to a luer lock connector and is made of PVC.

 

This bag is made of grade A ozone resistant teflon, holds up to 1000 ml, has only one chamber. It comes with 2 silicone cathers, 2 valves, and an adapter for slip-on catheters.

 

My favorite solution: use Promolife’s new 200 ml polycarbonate syringe instead of a bag. Make sure you also get a valve and an adapter, if you opt for slip-on catheters. If you decide to go with luer lock catheters, get the valve as well as some spare luer locks.

A silicone catheter for rectal insufflations from Promolife.

Don’t forget to get the adapter: this allows you to connect a slip-on catheter (as pictured to the left) to the ozone output tubing.

 

Or get a catheter with a luer lock attachment. No adapter necessary in order to connect it to your ozone output tubing. A simple luer lock connector is all you need. 

 

 

The “standard” catheter out of PVC for rectal insufflations, also from Promolife.

Extras: 2) Latex free gloves, 3) a lubricant, 4) garbage bin.

2) Rectal insufflations are a messy affair. It’s recommended to use gloves when applying the lubricant, introducing the catheter, and pulling it out. Make sure the gloves will be latex-free since ozone destroys latex immediately.

3) Applying a lubricant makes the introduction of the cathether much easier. You can use ozonated oil or any cream of your choice.

4) Once you pull the catheter out, you want to have a garbage bin lined with a plastic bag near by. You want to place the bin close enough, so that you’ll be able to place the dirty catheter inside with one hand without having to get up from the reclined position you’ll be in. It’s recommended to stay horizontal for at least a few minutes after the RI before getting up.

 

 

RECTAL INSUFFLATIONS WITH A BAG, HOW TO PUT THE EQUIPMENT TOGETHER AND HOW TO USE IT:

Suggested are the following settings:

Oxygen flow: not important

Ozone concentration: 10 to 50 ug/ml (gamma)

Duration: 5 to 10 minutes to empty the bag manually

Extras: old or white towels (ozone will bleach everything)

Suggested is a preparatory enema to clean the colon. Minimum requirement is a recent bowel movement.

For an overview of the different connectors and tubing, please go to How to connect ozone equipment.

Connect the oxygen source (either tank or concentrator) with the ozone generator inlet via tubing (either silicone or PVC). Attach one end of silicone tubing to the ozone generator “ozone out” outlet and the other end with the inlet of the bag, while the outlet of the bag is closed so that no ozone can leak out during fill-up. Turn on the oxygen source and set it at the desired oxygen flow. Turn the ozone generator on and if necessary, turn the ozone concentration dial to the desired ozone concentration. The bag is now being filled with the oxygen/ozone mix. Once the bag is full with the desired amount, close the inlet of the bag, and disconnect the silicone tubing from the bag. Shut off the oxygen source and turn the ozone generator off. Now the ozone is trapped inside the bag and you can prepare the catheter.

Lie on either side (some suggest on the left side, some on the right side. See what works best for you.). Apply some oil or cream externally around the anus to ease the introduction of the catheter. Insert the catheter as deeply as you comfortably can without forcing it. Attach to the outlet of the bag to the catheter. Open the outlet of the bag and start gently squeezing the bag with your hands. This is how you slowly push the ozone into your colon. The procedure should take a few minutes to complete.

 

DIRECT RECTAL INSUFFLATIONS, WHAT EQUIPMENT YOU NEED:

 

b) For direct rectal insufflations you need:

oxygen source + ozone generator +  catheter

ozone rectal insufflations direct diagram


Oxygen source: Either an oxygen tank or an oxygen concentrator can be used. Both the oxygen concentrator and oxygen tank have to allow for low oxygen flows. A maximum flow of 1/8 LPM is recommended. (1/32 is less than 1/16 which in turn is less than 1/8 LPM).

Oxygen concentrator: there are several possibilities. One can either use a low flow oxygen concentrator which allows for oxygen flows of maximum 1/8 LPM or one can use a regular oxygen concentrator (which usually allows for oxygen flows of 0.5 to 5 LPM) and attach an external low flow regulator.

Oxygen tank: either industrial or medical oxygen tanks should be equipped with pediatric regulators. Pediatric or low flow regulators allow for oxygen flows from 1/32, 1/16 to 1/8 LPM.

Ozone generator: It should be a generator which uses ozone resistant materials in the air chamber, can be fed oxygen from an oxygen concentrator or an oxygen tank, can reliably produce stable ozone concentrations at given oxygen flows, and does not exceed ozone concentrations of 80 ug/ml. For direct rectal insufflations it should be able to generate ozone concentrations between 20 and 40 ug/ml (gamma) at oxygen flows of 1/32 to 1/8 LPM.

Accessories: 1) Catheters: most are made of either PVC or silicone. 2) Make sure you have the right connectors. Luer lock catheters will require luer lock connectors, slip-on catheters will require a special adapter, as sold by Promolife, see below. 3.) You may also need some additional silicone tubing.

A silicone catheter for rectal insufflations from Promolife.

The “standard” PVC catheter for rectal insufflations, also from Promolife.

 

Don’t forget to get the adapter: this allows you to connect a non-luer lock catheter to the ozone output tubing.

 

This catheter has a luer lock attachment. You don’t need an adapter in order to connect it to your ozone output tubing. A simple luer lock connector is enough. 

Many ozone generators already come with luer lock connectors. You can also buy them separately.

In order to be able to perform rectal insufflations, you may need to get some extra silicone tubing.

 

Extras: 2) Latex free gloves,  3) a lubricant, 4) a timer, 5) garbage bin.

2) Rectal insufflations are a messy affair. It’s recommended to use gloves to when applying the lubricant, introducing the catheter, and pulling it out. Make sure the gloves will be latex-free since ozone destroys latex immediately.

3) Applying a lubricant makes the introduction of the cathether much easier. You can use ozonated oil or any cream of your choice.

4) A timer – very important when performing RI without a bag. You do not want to introduce more than 500 ml of gas at one time. How to calculate the maximum allowed time for RI? Take the flow of the oxygen in LPM, example 1/8 LPM, and take half of the denominator (8 in that case), so 4. That’s the maximum time in minutes you should be performing the insufflation for. In our example: 4 minutes.

5) Once you pull the catheter out, you want to have a garbage bin lined with a plastic bag near by. You want to place the bin close enough, so that you’ll be able to place the dirty catheter inside with one hand without having to get up from the reclined position you’ll be in. It’s recommended to stay horizontal for at least a few minutes after the RI before getting up.

 

DIRECT RECTAL INSUFFLATIONS, HOW TO PUT THE EQUIPMENT TOGETHER AND HOW TO USE IT:

Suggested are the following settings:
 
Oxygen flow: 1/32 LPM to 1/8 LPM
(1/32 LPM is a slower flow than 1/8 LPM)
 
Ozone concentration: 10 to 50 gamma
 
Maximum volume: 500 ml
 
Time: Depends on the o2 flow. At 1/8 LPM the maximum time is 4 min, at 1/16 LPM the maximum time is 8 min, at 1/32 LPM the maximum time is 16 min.
 

Suggested is a preparatory enema to clean the colon. Minimum requirement is a recent bowel movement.

For an overview of the different connectors and tubing, please go to How to connect ozone equipment.

Connect the oxygen source (either tank or concentrator) with the ozone generator inlet via tubing (either silicone or PVC). Attach silicone tubing to the ozone generator “ozone out” outlet. Lie on either side (some suggest on the left side, some on the right side. See what works best for you.). Apply oil externally to the rectum. Insert a catheter as deeply as you comfortably can without forcing it. Turn on the oxygen and set it at the suggested oxygen flow (1/32 to 1/8 LPM). Connect the “ozone out” silicone tubing with the catheter. Turn on the ozone generator and set it on the desired ozone concentration. During direct rectal insufflation it’s important to use a timer to not infuse more than 500 ml of gas into the colon.

Example: if you set your oxygen concentrator at 1/8 LPM that means that every minute 125 ml of gas are being introduced into your colon. (1/8 LPM = 0.125 LPM. 1 liter = 1000 ml. 0.125 liters = 125 millilitres.). Which means that at this flow you will reach 500 ml after 4 minutes: 4 min x 125 ml = 500 ml. So at an oxygen flow of 1/8 LPM do not exceed 4 minutes of continuous direct insufflations.

 

 

RISKS AND HOW TO AVOID THEM

 

Risk: colon rupture
 
Solution:
  • use a bag
  • if you use a bag and squeeze it manually, take your time. Allow the procedure to last 5 to 10 minutes
  • do not introduce more than 500 ml of gas at one time.
  • if performed without a bag, do not use oxygen flows of more than 1/8 LPM (so stay at 1/8, 1/16, or 1/32 LPM.)
  • Do you have reason to believe your colon is weak and prone to rupture? Do not perform RI!

 

CONTRAINDICATIONS

 

  • weak colon, prone to rupture
  • transplanted organ

 

 

None of the ozone generators presented on this website have been approved for medical purposes. Any application of the machines for other than water purification is at the sole risk of the user.

Legal Disclaimer

Information provided is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. No health claims for these products or diagnostic tools have been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), nor has the FDA nor any other medical authority approved these products to diagnose, cure, or prevent disease. Since every person is unique, we highly recommend you to consult with your licensed health care practitioner about the use of ozone products in your particular situation. Neither The Power of Ozone nor the manufacturers of these items are responsible for the misuse of this equipment. It is highly advised to receive professional council from a licensed doctor before using Ozone Therapy or any of the mentioned products or tests on yourself.

 

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20 Comments

  1. DAVID HANKS

    I LIKE YOU SITE IT IS VERY HELPFUL
    THANK YOU

    Reply
  2. Tony Tan

    Where to purchase equipments for rectal insufflation at Perth WA.
    Tks

    Reply
    • paola d

      Hi Tony,
      best is to join the Facebook group “Ozone Therapy at home Australia”.
      They will give you tips where to get the best deals for your equipment.

    • Joanne

      Hi

      I am in Perth, WA and I bought the equipment from prolife. No issue with importing.

      Getting the oxygen source is a bit more difficult because you need UHP oxygen and if you don’t have a prescription you need to give another reason for its delivery. The cylinders are also extremely large.

  3. Cassie

    Where can I purchase equipment for rectal insufflation in the United States?

    Reply
  4. Joyce Stephenson

    How do I purchase an ozone therapy machine in Queensland Australia?
    Joyce

    Reply
    • paola d

      Hi Joyce,
      all the ozone generators listed here are available internationally: http://thepowerofozone.com/equipment/ozone-generators/ .
      Make sure to pick the 230 V type if you gonna pick one which does not run on universal voltage.
      I can also recommend joining the Facebook group “Ozone at home Australia/international”.

  5. Ruth

    How often should RI be used (times per week?) and for how long (weeks/months/years)?

    Reply
    • paola d

      Hi Ruth,
      there are different opinions on that and best is to consult an ozone doctor or ozone practitioner.
      First, it depends what you are treating.
      Some doctors say one can do up to 2 RI per day daily for a number of weeks or until resolution of symptoms.
      There are home users who have been doing RI three times per week for months. As long as one gets benefit from them, one can keep going, seems to be the consensus.

      Hope this helps.

  6. Rodney Thomas

    Do the benefits of insufflation come from increasing oxygenation in the host through a systemic increase in o2? Or does the o3 (or its metabolites) have systemic oxidative capacity? I assume it’s the latter, otherwise a plain old o2 insufflation would suffice?

    On another note, do you have any second hand experience of penile insufflations? Ive been using them and seem to get much better results compared with rectal, however I’m not sure on what’s considered a safe volume and at what gamma. I would be keen to learn more.

    Many thanks

    Reply
    • paola d

      Hi Rodney,
      the benefits from insufflation come from directly killing pathogens and inflammation and from the by-products like lipid peroxides.
      I have no first, second nor third hand 😉 experience with penile insufflation, sorry.
      But I would not go over 150 ml in volume at a concentration of max ca. 50 mcg/ml.
      Hope this helps!

  7. Andrew

    Is it necessary to replace the silicon tubing used in insuflations in a regular time period? I can’t seem to find any information on this.

    Reply
    • paola d

      Hi Andrew,
      you don’t really need to replace silicone tubing. But if you see dirt inside which you can’t get out or if you see that it starts getting hard, then it is better to replace it.
      I also prefer to have a dedicated RI or VI tubing, in order to not use the same tubing for let’s say ozonating water that I used for RI, know what I mean?

  8. Bill

    Good instructional article. I have been doing RI for about a year using the bags and catheters. The bags are good for 5-8 uses. They begin to leak and no longer fill completely. I see that Promolife has replaced the 5-pack with a 3-pack for $59.95. Yet I can buy a single bag for $9.95. The single bag is half price!

    I am curious about the syringe. Does it breakdown after 5-8 uses like the bags? Are there larger ones – like 500 or 750 ml?

    Reply
    • paola d

      Hi Bill,
      yes, I saw that with the 3-pack. That is weird … I will ask them about it.

      The syringe definitely lasts longer.
      I am not aware of larger syringes. Larger ones would be really difficult to handle, I can imagine, since one needs to be able to grab the plunger with one’s fingers. A 500ml syringe would make that basically impossible.

  9. Nick L

    What impact does rectal ozone have on your microbiom – do you need to take probiotics if you are doing rectal ozone? Is there a number of consecutive sessions you should not go beyond at one time?

    Reply
    • paola d

      Hi Nick,
      many ozone practitioners recommend probiotics after RI. I think it is not absolutely necessary, but not detrimental either, in most cases.
      “Is there a number of consecutive sessions you should not go beyond at one time?” – Not that I know, no.

  10. Carla maloney

    I have been on a liquid diet for 2 years(juicing and bone broth).solid food food gets stuck in my esophagus.2 years ago the doctor urged me to go to emergency room as he thought I had all the symptoms of esophageal cancer, I never went.did not like the survival rate of modern medicine.it all started with constant extreme stress.acid reflux destroyed digestive tract and gut lining.barely digesting food.do not have bowel movement unless I have an enema.started doing rectal ozone insufflations, at home it’s giving me painful heartburn.i want to continue doing it because I believe it will work.how can I heal and protect the digestive tract from the ozone so I can continue doing it.i need something powerful asap.Please help, don’t know what else to do.Thank You Paola

    Reply
    • paola d

      Hi Carla,
      please, find a doctor in your area who does ozone therapy and consult with him.
      If ozone is the solution for you, he should be able to offer guidance.
      But you might also want to switch to vaginal insufflations and start drinking ozonated water and see how that goes.
      If you have amalgam fillings – have them removed. If you had them removed already, then starting chelation would be a good idea: http://www.maybeitsmercury.com/how-exactly-to-chelate-using-the-andy-cutler-protocol.html

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