OXYGEN CONCENTRATORS

by | Sep 25, 2018 | 2 comments

An oxygen concentrator offers independence: as long as you have a power supply, you have oxygen. You don’t need to worry about refills. You will never run out of the life sustaining gas. Purchasing a concentrator usually means a higher upfront cost, but less maintenance long-term. In my opinion, a refurbished oxygen concentrator with an external low flow regulator is the most convenient solution for home ozone applications.

OXYGEN CONCENTRATORS – DIFFERENT MODELS

The most common brands of oxygen concentrators are Invacare, Respironics, and Airsep. I’ve had all of them at some point or another plus a couple more less known ones like DeVillbis or Kröber. One of my favorites so far is the blue Respironics Everflo. If you are lucky enough to find one with a built-in low flow regulator or feel confident enough to hack it yourself, then go for it. You can’t go wrong with a Respironics. 

The selection of good quality concentrators is vast. Here just a few examples. 

 

Airsep VisionAire

The Airsep VisionAire. Important: it runs on 220V!

Technical Specifications:

Percentage of oxygen purity: 87 to 95%

Refurbished?: NEW

Warranty: 3 years

Low flow? No

Additional cost to make it low flow? + US$100

Good for all ozone applications except IV? Yes

Weight: 30 lbs

Price: US$ 1,450.00

Sign up for my newsletter to get a code for 7% OFF. 

Invacare Platinum

The Platinum Invacare 10. Invacare is one of the most popular brands of oxygen concentrators. 

Technical Specifications:

Percentage of oxygen purity: 87 to 94%

Refurbished?: Yes

Warranty: 2 years

Low flow? No

Additional cost to make it low flow? + US$ 149.95

Good for all ozone applications except IV? Yes

Weight: 54 lbs

Price: US$ 1,095.00

Sign up for my newsletter to get a code for 7% OFF. 

Respironics Everflo

One of my favorite oxygen concentrators: the Respironics Everflo. If you find one for a few hundred bucks on craigslist or ebay – buy it! Add to it a low flow regulator and you’re set!

Technical Specifications:

Percentage of oxygen purity: 90 to 96%

Refurbished?: Yes

Warranty: 2 years

Low flow? No

Additional cost to make it low flow? + US$ 149.95

Good for all ozone applications except IV? Yes

Weight: 31 lbs

Price: US$ 699.00

Sign up for my newsletter to get a code for 7% OFF. 

What to look for when buying an oxygen concentrator?

Oxygen purity: When administering any type of ozone therapy, you should strive for a high percentage of oxygen. A concentrator should put out a minimum of 90% pure oxygen. Most machines on the market go above that. Most specifications show the oxygen percentage for flows of 1 to 5 LPM. The lower the flow, the higher the oxygen output.

Contrary to popular belief, oxygen concentrators do not produce any significant amounts of nitrogen. As good as all oxygen concentrators contain a zeolite filter which filters out nearly all the nitrogen. The remaining 3 to 10% are mostly argon (a noble gas), carbon dioxide (CO2), and just minor amounts of nitrogen.

New or refurbished? Many states require a prescription when buying a new oxygen concentrator. An exception are refurbished concentrators. Well maintained, a refurbished compressor can serve you years.

Warranty: Especially when buying used concentrators, it is a good idea to inform yourself about the costs if something does break down and how long the warranty lasts. Many sellers of refurbished concentrators offer a one to two year warranty.

Is it low flow? What is the lowest flow the machine produces? Ozone applications require very low oxygen flows of a fraction of a liter per minute. Your machine should allow you to go as low as 1/8 LPM. This is low enough to be able to perform all the necessary applications at a high enough ozone concentration without compromising safety. Some ozone generators may require even lower flows of down to 1/16 LPM. 

Most oxygen concentrators cannot go that low. A solution is to buy an external low flow regulator or a concentrator which has a low flow regulator already built in – the best option in my opinion! 

What are the additional costs of making it low flow? Promolife’s external flow regulator costs US$ 150. I’ve been using it extensively for the past several months and it hasn’t failed me so far. When it comes to oxygen, it’s my favorite solution. Or you can buy a regulator for around $33 and insert it into the machine yourself or have a technician do it. 

Is it possible to use an oxygen concentrator for all the applications? Oxygen concentrators allow to do all the insufflations, sauna, water, and oil. Medical oxygen tanks with a higher oxygen purity are used for invasive methods like IVs or other type of injections.

money SUPER LOW BUDGET TIP: DIY LOW FLOW OXYGEN CONCENTRATOR

  • Go on your local Craigslist or Ebay and find used oxygen concentrators in good shape. Often, one can find a good Invacare, DeVilbiss, or AirSep concentrator for $150 or less. Then watch this video where my friend Teresa Caballero explains how to use a $32 gadget and some silicone tubing to turn most high flow concentrators into low flow machines.
  • Find a local oxygen shop with someone who knows his/her way around oxygen concentrators and ask them if they can insert that low flow regulator into your concentrator, essentially switching out the high flow and substituting it with the low flow one. 
  • You don’t feel like engaging in craft projects? Then get this external low flow regulator and use it with your craigslist treasure:

promolife external low flow meter

I’m leaving you with a last picture of my Respironics and external low flow regulator set up. It also shows my new PINK!!!! (ok, rosé really) couch in the background, so that’s an extra bonus. But seriously, that external regulator is dope. I’m not saying this just because of the commissions. I’m saying this because 9 years ago when I started out ozonating myself at home, I had bought that more expensive external regulator which costs nearly $300. And guess what happened? It made my concentrator break down after several weeks. This happened twice. I don’t know how that happened, but I guess it was likely because it was creating too much back pressure which made the machine crap out. After that I switched to a tank. Back to present day: I have now been using the Promolife external regulator for over six months more or less on a daily basis without ANY problems or hiccups. And it costs less than the other regulator. So this is a product I totally stand behind. Just saying …

You can’t beat that combo: a Respironics Everflo, Promolife’s external low flow regulator and my rosé colored couch in the background. 

Except for the Ozonette, none of the ozone generators presented on this website have been approved for medical purposes. Any application of the machines for other than water purification is at the sole risk of the user.

 

Affiliate Disclosure

This website contains affiliate links, which means Paola may receive a percentage of any product or service you purchase using the links in the articles or advertisements. You will pay the same price for all products and services, and your purchase helps support Paola‘s ongoing research and work.

Thanks for your support!

 

Legal Disclaimer

Information provided is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. No health claims for these products or diagnostic tools have been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), nor has the FDA nor any other medical authority approved these products to diagnose, cure, or prevent disease. Since every person is unique, we highly recommend you to consult with your licensed health care practitioner about the use of ozone products in your particular situation. Neither The Power of Ozone nor the manufacturers of these items are responsible for the misuse of this equipment. It is highly advised to receive professional council from a licensed doctor before using Ozone Therapy or any of the mentioned products or tests on yourself.

2 Comments

  1. Adam

    Hi Paola
    The old link for the $10 ebay flowmeter does not work.
    However there are other ones on ebay.
    Would any 0-1LPM Oxygen Flow Meter with Control Valve work?
    I see SimplyO3 is selling one for $33, but it looks the same as the cheaper ones on ebay.
    Thanks so much for all of the information and education!

    Reply
    • paola d

      Hi Adam,

      thank you for the heads up!
      Yes, this one looks good.

      Best,

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe

About Me

Hi! I’m Paola, the Crazy Ozone Lady and self-proclaimed ozone junkie. I've been using ozone on and off for 12 years and still discovering new things every day.

Join over 12,000 Ozone Enthusiasts

Subscribe to the mailing list!

The Power of Ozone Newsletter

You know how this goes: you sign up once, and then you keep getting emails on a daily basis. No matter how much you liked the idea of a newsletter in the beginning, eventually it always turns into spam. Ugh!

See, this will never happen here. I write waaay too slow to create spam. Just check out my blog. Even if I wanted to, I'm unable.

You're safe.

 

 

© 2018 The Power Of Ozone | Imprint | Privacy Policy | Credits